Our Schools: Learning how to contribute to our school and community

The Grades 3 and 4 students from Mrs. Smart and Mrs. Black’s class have thoroughly enjoyed this opportunity to share our learning with the community.

In our final article for the year, Megan, Ryan, Oscar, Sarah, Ali, Fern, Ruby, Serena, Andrei, Levon, Killian, Ryan, Nathan, Markus, Levi, Aiden, Tannen, Lucy and Kohen will share how we are learning to contribute to our school and community.

article continues below

To us, contribution means giving something to the community, sharing your time, helping someone and being kind and sometimes by being a leader. We think this is important because this can help you to make friends. If everyone makes a small contribution, it can turn into a bigger contribution and the world will be a better place.

We started the year learning about leadership and what makes a good leader. We learned from guest speakers that leaders need to be kind, stick up for others, have confidence, be honest and believe in themselves. A leader needs to stay true to their own ideas and be their own kind of person.

Good leaders put others before themselves. If you take on the responsibility to be a leader, you have to own it. We took on leadership challenges in the school like taking younger students for runs because they were too young to be on the cross-country team. Some students led hockey skills in P.E. to teach the rest of the class how to play. We held a bake sale to raise money for Children’s Hospital too.

Some other ways we have made a contribution was when we do activities with our little buddies. We went skating with them and we showed them that even if you are new to skating, there are others who can help you out. We also shared all the stuff we had learned on our visits to the Audain Art Museum with our little buddies. The Audain Art museum is really special to our class, and we wanted to share the learning because it is so important. 

We are making a contribution when we share our learning about residential school and First Nations stories. Tanina, who is fun and teaches us all about First Nation learning, told us legends about how landforms were made. Some of the other things we learned were songs, art and how we can use plants in the outdoors for medicines, healing and food. 

Tanina’s mom also came to Aboriginal Day and we learned all about plants like fireweed which can be used for healing a sunburn. If we spread the word about what we have learned, then more people know, understand and can learn from what we know.    

As our school year comes to an end, we are contributing to the school community by building buddy benches. It started with Ruby’s speech in May about how kids can make a difference. In her speech, she wanted to bring back the buddy bench so kids who don’t have anyone to play with can find a friend and go play.

We decided to build them, and with the help of Jane, who works in our class, Andrei’s dad Bruce, and many of our parents, we built six benches for the school. We had to collaborate to make the benches and needed each one to be unique with happy colours and kind messages. 

Building the benches took lots of collaboration and creativity. Working on them helped us to become really great friends. Our hope is that they will be used well and when we are older and come back to visit the school, they will still be here. We hope that everyone at Myrtle Philip enjoys them.   

We would like to acknowledge the newspaper for allowing us to share our ideas and experiences with the community because this allowed us to make a contribution. We hope that you too can make contribution to your community!

© Copyright 2018 Whistler Question

Comments

NOTE: To post a comment you must have an account with at least one of the following services: Disqus, Facebook, Twitter, Google+ You may then login using your account credentials for that service. If you do not already have an account you may register a new profile with Disqus by first clicking the "Post as" button and then the link: "Don't have one? Register a new profile".

The Whistler Question welcomes your opinions and comments. We do not allow personal attacks, offensive language or unsubstantiated allegations. We reserve the right to edit comments for length, style, legality and taste and reproduce them in print, electronic or otherwise. For further information, please contact the editor or publisher, or see our Terms and Conditions.

comments powered by Disqus

Question POLL

Do you plan to celebrate Canada Day?

or  view results

Popular Columnists